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Alectrosaurus olseni (Charles Gilmore, 1933)

Name Means: "Unmarried lizard" Length: 5 meters
Pronounced: al-Eck-trow-Saw-rus Weight: 1,000 to 2,000 pounds
When it lived: Late Cretaceous - around 96 million years ago    
Where found: Gobi Desert, Mongolia    

Introduction

   Alectrosaurus seems to have been quite rare.  It was much smaller than Tyrannosaurus rex; it was slender and does not preserve well.  Like other members of the tyrannosaur family, it was bipedal.  There have been a few findings of Alectrosaurus, and  little has been published about them. printed about them. One important find is that it had a furcula (wishbone). For many years it was believed that only birds had this bone.  It is now known to be common for a theropod. Since then other theropods have been found to have had them.

History

   Alectrosaurus was discovered in 1923 during one of the American Museum of Natural History expeditions to China led by Roy Chapman Andrews. There was confusion when it was found originally, due to the fact that it was found with a segnosaur. The two animals were thought to be one.  Chapman found a partial femur, tibia, fibula and pubic foot, It was described in 1933 by palaeontologist Charles W.Gilmore.. Since then a partial skull, shoulder girdle, ribs, fircula, should blade and two vertebrate have been discovered.  There are no complete specimens, but there is enough skeleton material to reconstruct how it looked.  It was re-described in 1989

Species

Alectrosaurus olseni is the only species in this genus.

 

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