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Other Tyrannosaurs
   Prior to designing Tyrannosaurs, extensive effort went into research the subject.  A primary goal was to identify the species that the poster would show.  The species listed below were rejected because there was simply not enough known about them for our artist to accurately reconstruct them. 
Futabasaurus lambert  (Lambert, 1990)
Name Means: "Futaba Lizard" Length: Unknown
Pronounced:  few -Tah-bah-Sore-us Weight: Unknown
When it lived: Late Cretaceous - 87 MYA    
Where found: Japan    
   Futabasaurus may be a Japanese member of the tyrannosaur family.  However, only one bone has been found so it is difficult to determine exactly what this animal was or what it looked like.  In the Mesozoic Era - the era in which dinosaurs lived - Japan was connected to the rest of Asia. It is possible that Futabasaurus is really Tarborsaurus  bataar, the great meat-eater from Cretaceous Period China. 
Itemirus medullaris (Kurzanov 1976)
Name Means: "Itemir ? " Length: Unknown
Pronounced:  EYE-te-MEER-us Weight: Unknown
When it lived: Late Cretaceous - about 90 million years ago    
Where found: Uzbekistan.     
     Itemirus medullaris was a small, theropod dinosaur  from the Central Kyzlkuum Sands (Late Cretaceous, late Turonian Age) of Dzhara-Kuduk, Itemir, Uzbekistan.  It is known only from a braincase  (the part of the skull that contains the brain) It shares with Stokesosaurus in the presence of very deep pockets on the lateral surface of the basipterygoid process. The type species is I. medullaris.
Shanshanosaurus huoyanshanensis (Dong, 1977)
Name Means: "Shanshan Lizard" Length: 8 feet (2.4 meters)
Pronounced:  shan-SHAN-uh-SAWR-us Weight: (110 - 200 lb).
When it lived: Late Cretaceous - around 83-65 million years ago    
Where found: Shanshan, China    
   Known only from a partial skull and a few bones.  The skull shows that Shanshanosaurus had a large wedged-shaped head, small eyes, sharp teeth, a long neck and legs 3 times as long as its arms.  It shares with advanced tyrannosaurs a reduced maxillary and dentary tooth count. Additional features demonstrate the tyrannosaurid nature of this taxon (Holtz in press a, b), but its precise position among the tyrant dinosaur cannot be established pending more detailed study of the specimen.
Siamotyrannus isanensis
Name Means: "Siam Tyrant" Length: 23 ft.(7 meters)
Pronounced:  sye-Am-oh-tye-Ran-us Weight: 1.5 tons (2,700 kilos)
When it lived: Early Cretaceous - 95 MYA    
Where found: Thailand    
   Siamotyrannus is the earliest known member of the tyrannosaur family.  This medium-sized carnivore seems to be about halfway evolved into a T. rex. A number of scientists believe tyrannosaurs originated in Asia and this discovery supports that theory. The genus is based on pelvic and tail vertebrae, no skull material was discovered for Siamotyrannus. It has features that seem to show an intermediate stage of evolution between the allosaurs and the tyrannosaurs.  Not yet described.
Stokesosaurus clevelandi
Name Means: "Stokes Lizard" Length: 13 feet (4 m)
Pronounced: Stoke-so-Saw-rus Weight: Unknown
When it lived: Jurassic to Cretaceous - around 150-145 million years ago    
Where found: Utah    
   Stokesosaurus may have been the first member of the tyrannosaur family.  Known only from a few bones, this dinosaur provides tantalizing clues to the possible evolution of the tyrannosaur lineage. Discovered in the famous Cleveland-Lloyd quarry, scientists hope to find more of this creature among the many thousands of fossils discovered this bone bed. Until the discovery of a braincase, it was thought that Stokesosaurus might have belonged to the ceratosaurs.
Iliosuchus incognitus   megalosaurus
 
Itemirus medullaris
 Itemirus medullaris from the Central Kyzlkuum Sands (Late Cretaceous, late Turonian Age) of Dzhara-Kuduk, Itemir, Uzbekistan, is known only from a braincase (Kurzanov 1976). It shares with Stokesosaurus in the presence of very deep pockets on the lateral surface of the basipterygoid process.
Itemirus medullaris
 
Tonouchisaurus mongoliensis (Barsbold, 1994) 
Name Means: "Mongolian ? " Length: 3 feet
Pronounced: TON-ouch-eh-SAWR-u Weight: Unknown
When it lived: Cretaceous    
Where found: Mongolia    
   This dinosaur is known only from newspaper accounts.  It discovered by a civil engineer named Tonouchi,
It is reputedly a small theropod (possibly an ancestral tyrannosaur ) with relatively short forelimbs and relatively long hind limbs.
Tyrannosauroidea
                           |  |?-Iliosuchus incognitus
                           |  |--Dilong paradoxus
                           |  `--+--+--Bagaraatan ostromi
                           |     |  `?-Xinjiangovenator parvus
                           |     `--+--Stokesosaurus clevelandi
                           |        |--Aviatyrannis jurassica
                           |        |--Dryptosaurus aquilunguis
                           |        |--+--Labocania anomala
                           |        |  `--"Alashansaurus" maortuensis
                           |        `--+--Eotyrannus lengi
                           |           `--+--Appalachiosaurus montgomeriensis
                           |              `--Tyrannosauridae
                           |                 |*-Albertosaurus? incrassatus
                           |                 |*-Alectrosaurus olseni
                           |                 |*-Aublysodon mirandus
                           |                 |*-Aublysodon? amplus
                           |                 |*-Aublysodon? cristatus 
                           |                 |*-Aublysodon? lateralis
                           |                 |*-Deinodon horridus
                           |                 |*-Deinodon? falculus
                           |                 |*?Deinodon? grandis
                           |                 |*-Deinodon? hazenianus
                           |                 |*-Deinodon? kenabekides
                           |                 |*-Tarbosaurus? periculosus 
                           |                 |--Albertosaurinae
                           |                 |  |--Gorgosaurus libratus
                           |                 |  `--Albertosaurus sarcophagus
                           |                 `--Tyrannosaurinae
                           |                    |?-Alioramus remotus
                           |                    |--Daspletosaurus torosus
                           |                    `--+--Tarbosaurus bataar
                           |                       |--Tarbosaurus? luanchuanensis
                           |                       |?-Tarbosaurus? zhuchangensis
                           |                       `--Tyrannosaurus rex

 

 
 
 

 

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